Ginger Berry Nutty Crisp

Ginger, Berry, Nutty Crisp | Selma's TableI rather love September – not only because my favourite (!) son was born towards the latter end of the month but also because it’s full of new beginnings. A new school year begins with high hopes and  all the paraphernalia that goes with it – uniform, school shoes, pens and pencils, geometry sets, books, teachers and classmates. Only this year, as Jake enters what is known as Sixth Form (the last two years of school before University) there is no “uniform” other than the Sixth Form tie. All the boys must wear a suit (navy, charcoal or black), a white shirt and black shoes. He does go off to school looking terribly smart!

Ginger, Berry, Nutty Crisp | Selma's TableMeaning to make a crumble to showcase a pretty bowl (I know, how shallow am I?), I bought some lovely blackberries and raspberries from the market. But making a crumble seemed akin to admitting that the summer was over – which I am not quite ready to do! The weather has been warm in that September sort of way and the trees seem determined to hang onto their verdant hues though there are a few on the turn too.

Ginger, Berry, Nutty Crisp | Selma's TableIt didn’t seem right somehow to be making a winteresque pudding so I adapted the Peach and Amaretti Crisp I made last week to make a Ginger Berry Nutty Crisp. I used a spicy biscuit called Speculoo, added some ground ginger and walnuts to the base and topping and included that gorgeous Japanese citrus flavour called Yuzu in the icing. I used a golden icing sugar which is unrefined – it gives the icing a gorgeous caramel colour and flavour too. Any spicy biscuit will do – by spicy I mean with ginger or cinnamon – not chilli!! And if you can’t get ahold of Yuzu seasoning (please do look out for it – it is amazing in dips and with fish as well as cocktails) then use a couple of teaspoons of lemon juice along with some zest.

Ginger, Berry, Nutty Crisp | Selma's TableA quick word on preparing pans for baking. I don’t think that enough emphasis is placed on it but it is essential to do this well so that your delicious and lovingly prepared bakes are easy to turn out and present. If you bake frequently, it is completely worth buying pre-cut circles, strips and rolls of baking paper. In the UK, Lakeland and John Lewis are great resources as are eBay and Amazon. It’s not necessary to grease and paper the tins but do use a few dabs of butter so that the paper sticks to the tin and doesn’t move about.

How to line a baking tinAnd how to easily paper a square or rectangular tin? You can either cut out two long strips that are as wide as the tin so that they cover the base as well as the sides or you can do what I do which is to turn the tin over then drape and cut off enough paper to fit over it. Make a neat pleat at the corners- as if gift wrapping then turn the tin over and the paper should slip straight in. For a circular tin, cut out a strip which is a little longer than the length of the circumference. Then make a narrow fold along the length of it and snip along it at an angle. Dab a little butter along the sides of the tin and place the strip along it with the snipped section flat against the base of the pan. Place a circle of paper on the base on top of the snipped section and you are good to go.  I have lots of tips that you might find interesting on my TIps and Tricks page. If you go over and take a look, do leave your best tips in the comments box. I will include them with a credit to you.

Ginger, Berry, Nutty Crisp | Selma's TableI’m taking my Ginger Berry Nutty Crisp along to Angie of the Novice Gardener’s Fiesta Friday #32 – the weekly virtual get-together where we share fabulous stories and recipes from all over the world. Please do join in by seeing what is on offer or sharing a post. This week (as well as last week) Hilda from Along the Grapevine is helping Angie as a co-host. Hilda lives on a rather idyllic 7 acre property in Ontario, where she shares her stories and recipes of all the things she grows and forages on her land – this week it’s her incredible tomatoes – sigh! And Angie has brought a delicious Chilli con Carne – one of my favourite dishes! A huge thanks to both Angie and Hilda for hosting!!

Ginger, Berry, Nutty Crisp | Selma's TableClick on the Fiesta Friday badge below to join the party – you can submit a post (be sure to include a link to Angie and Hilda’s FF#32 posts – it’s only polite and also ensures that you can be considered for a feature next week!)  or just take a look at others are up to!

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Ginger Berry Nutty Crisp

  • Servings: 16 pieces
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

INGREDIENTS

For the base and topping:

  • 80 g Speculoo biscuits (a spicy biscuit)
  • 20 g walnuts
  • 190 g plain/AP flour
  • 50 g oats
  • 20 g ground almonds/almond meal/almond flour
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 150 g cold, unsalted butter, cubed
  • 50 g chopped walnuts – reserve for the topping

For the filling:

  • 275 – 300 g mixed soft berries I used raspberries and blackberries
  • 1 large egg
  • 100 g light brown sugar
  • 1 Tbsp ground almonds/almond meal

For the glaze:

  • ½ c golden icing/super fine sugar
  • 2 Tbsp crème fraîche
  • 2 tsp Yuzu Citrus Seasoning

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Pre-heat oven to 180 C/350 F
  2. Line a 9 inch square tin with greaseproof paper so that the base and sides are covered – use a few dabs of butter to get the paper to stick to the pan.
  3. While the oven is heating up, place the 20 g of walnuts on a tray and toast for 5 – 8 minutes. Cool, then place in a food processor and pulse until finely chopped. Don’t take it too far otherwise you will have a nut paste rather than a nut flour. Set aside.
  4. Place the Speculoo biscuits in a food processor and blitz to fine crumbs.
  5. Add the flour, oats, ground almonds, the ground walnuts and ginger and pulse a couple of times to combine.
  6. Add the cold butter and pulse until the mixture looks like coarse, damp sand.
  7. Set aside 1 cup of this mixture for the topping and tip the rest into the prepared tin. Pat it level – don’t press down too hard or it will be tough – then bake for 15 minutes.
  8. While the base is baking, get the filling ready; sort through the fruit and discard any mouldy ones.
  9. Using an electric mixer and a medium sized bowl, whisk the egg and sugar until coffee coloured and creamy – about 2 minutes. Then add the almond meal and salt and whisk again. Fold in the berries.
  10. After the base has been in the oven for 15 minutes, remove it and top with the filling – covering the hot base as evenly as you can with the fruit.
  11. Sprinkle over the chopped walnuts and the reserved topping.
  12. Bake for 30-35 minutes until golden brown.
  13. Cool in the tin for 10 minutes, then using the lining paper as handles, lift out and place on a wire rack to cool completely before glazing.
  14. Combine glaze ingredients together until smooth and drizzle over the top.

Stores brilliantly, covered in the fridge for 4-5 days.

© Selma Jeevanjee and Selma’s Table, 2013, 2014. Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material, including photographs without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Selma Jeevanjee and Selma’s Table with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Flourless Chocolate and Raspberry Torte

flourless-chocolate-and-raspberry-torteIt’s Friday and time to head on over to the friendliest virtual party going –  Angie’s Fiesta Friday; to catch up with everyone and enjoy the offerings they bring to the party. It’s not just food you know, although admittedly, that is the main thrust – just look at what else we’ve had recently…

  • Pang@CircaHappy brought these utterly stunning floral arrangements – Pang is a talented dynamo; her food is equally as beautiful and her photography is fabulous.
  • Megan@Firebonnet brought these amazing old Ladies Home Journals full of glorious hats from the early 1900’s. Megan has a joyful blog full of happiness, hope and art.
  • Rakhi@BlissBook  told us how she and her brother threw a surprise 30th anniversary party  for their parents, pulling it off magnificently despite her mother’s honed detective skills – a touching post with photos of pure happiness and joy that did make me well up a bit! 
  • Justine@ElecticOddsnSods brought some music to cook by and asked us to share our favourites too. Justine is at heart a writer and has three, yes I said three blogs, written in her inimitable and witty style.
  • Loretta@SafariOfTheMind shared her glorious gardens with us and they are quite something – jaw droppingly spectacular. Loretta has started blogging quite recently and her post on her trip to Kenya is quite the read.

So it’s not all delicious food, decadent puds and glamourous cocktails. Pour yourself an ice cold tall drink enjoy Fiesta Friday #20 which is very ably  hosted this week by Fae@Fae’sTwistandTango and Suzanne@PugintheKitchen. Fae needs little introduction – the original blog mother hen, she has nurtured and encouraged so many whilst maintaing a truly international, inspirational and delicious blog. Suzanne is a very creative and prolific cook who creates recipes for Wholefoods and my favourite website Food52. And how adorable are her pugs? Thank you ladies – it is going to be a blast!

If you blog, please do join in, reading the the guidelines first to get you going.

flourless-chocolate-and-raspberry-torteI, of course, stay true to my nature and bring something for the table. A rather grown up and glorious Flourless Chocolate and Raspberry Torte. A torte is defined as

a sweet cake or tart; from German Torte, via Italian from late Latin torta ’round loaf, cake’. Compare with tortilla

Oh, I do like a little word-history…

flourless-chocolate-and-raspberry-torteInspired by The River Cafe’s Easy Chocolate Nemesis Cake and Nigella’s Chocolate Meringue (which is my dinner party pudding of choice) , this is a dinner party pudding cake. With a crisp meringue exterior and a rich, dense, raspberry studded interior, it is a rather decadent affair. The espresso powder intensifies the chocolate flavour and the tart raspberries offset the sweetness.

flourless-chocolate-and-raspberry-torteWhile the torte is straightforward enough to make, there are a few crucial points that would be remiss of me not to highlight;

  • Take some time to line the sides and base of the tin with waxed paper.
  • The eggs must be at room temperature – they will not whip up to the volume required otherwise.
  • Ensure that the bowl and beaters for the egg whites are scrupulously clean – any bits of grease or egg yolk and they will not whip up as voluminously. Unless you have 2 sets of beaters, start with the whites first and then move onto the yolks.
  • Use large bowls – the whites whip up to 4-5 times their original volume.
  • When you are whipping the whites, add the sugar a little at a time.
  • This is a great article on the various stages of whipping egg whites (and cream)
  • Use a large metal spoon to fold in the egg whites – rubber spatulas destroy the volume.
  • When folding the second and third batches of egg whites, be gentle – don’t knock out the air. The whites are the only leavening agent.

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Flourless Chocolate and Raspberry Torte

  • Servings: 10 - 12 slices
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

INGREDIENTS

  • 50 g (3 Tbsp) butter
  • 200 g (7 oz) 70% cocoa, dark chocolate, broken up
  • 6 large room temperature eggs, yolks and whites separated into 2 large bowls
  • 225 g (1 cup) caster/superfine sugar, divided in half
  • 1 tsp balsamic vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp expresso powder
  • ¼ tsp salt (I used Maldon sea salt flakes)
  • 225g ripe raspberries
  • 1 x 23 cm/9″ springform baking tin, sides and bottom lined  with waxed paper

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Place the butter and the chocolate in a heat proof bowl and set over a pan of simmering water. The water should not  touch the bowl – the steam will heat and melt the chocolate and butter. Stir it every so often until melted, amalgamated and smooth. Alternatively, place in a microwave safe bowl, cover loosely and heat on 50% power, stirring every 30 seconds until melted and smooth – this should take about 2 minutes. I used the microwave. Leave it to cool whilst getting the rest of the ingredients ready.
  2. Pre-heat the oven to 180C/350F.
  3. Line the base and sides of the tin with waxed paper using a little butter to help it stick to the tin.
  4. Whip the egg whites in a large grease free bowl until foamy on a medium setting.
  5. Add the balsamic vinegar and whisk briefly.
  6. Increase the setting to high and start adding half the sugar very gradually. The mixture will start getting glossy and increase greatly in volume. Keep going until you get to the stiff peaks stage – when you pull your beaters out, the mixture forms a peak that doesn’t flop over.  Set aside while you get on with the egg yolks.
  7. Whip the egg yolks with the other half the sugar for about 3 or 4 minutes scraping down the sides of the bowl from time to time – the mixture will turn from gloopy and bright orange to a pale, thick and creamy mass.
  8. Add the espresso powder and the salt and whip to incorporate.
  9. Add the cooled but still liquid chocolate/butter mixture and whip again until it is evenly mixed.
  10. Using a large metal spoon, fold in the egg whites to the yolk/chocolate mixture in 3 batches. The first batch is really to temper or loosen up and lighten the yolk/chocolate mixture; fold in the remaining whites carefully trying to keep as much of the volume as you can.
  11. Scrape  into the prepared pan and top with the raspberries, pushing them in slightly.
  12. Bake for 40-45 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the middle of the cake comes out without any batter clinging to it.
  13. Cool in the pan, on a wire rack – it should collapse in the middle with a crisp meringue like shell and a fudgey centre, studded with raspberries.
  14. Serve in small slices with a little cream and a few fresh raspberries.

© Selma Jeevanjee and Selma’s Table, 2013, 2014. Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material, including photographs without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Selma Jeevanjee and Selma’s Table with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

No-churn Raspberry Swirl Vanilla Bean Ice Cream with Fino Sherry

no-churn-raspberry-swirl-vanilla-bean-ice-cream-with-fino-sherryThere is a sweet young man who sells all sorts of fruits and vegetable from trestle tables outside a crappy phone shop on the High Street. Most of the produce is in large plastic bowls which he empties straight into your shopping bag or one of his blue plastic ones. Some of the produce is too large for the bowls so sits piled up in crates and others are too delicate and come in their own punnets. Now, this produce is not organic or local and some of it is not at it’s best but this chap is outside no matter what the weather, charging a measly £1 per bowl, seven days a week. I always take a look to see what he has and try and buy something to support him. He is very honest, even going as far as to advise me not to buy any of the pawpaws the other day, as there were not very good!

no-churn-raspberry-swirl-vanilla-bean-ice-cream-with-fino-sherryHis produce is always really fresh on a Saturday. Last week he had fat juicy limes (seven for £1) rambutans (six for £1) loquats (a bowl for £1) and  heaped punnets of raspberries which I assumed were £1 each. Imagine my surprise when he put two in my bag! Jake had a friend coming over to do some revision with him and I was meandering down the High Street, planning what to dish up for dinner later. I decided on ice-cream for which the raspberries were destined, a roast chicken with roast cauliflower and chickpeas (hello Elaine!), the first potato salad of the year and a crunchy green salad. As I was unloading the shopping I remember thinking that I would have to throw out most of the raspberries as they were probably mouldy but other than 3 or 4 which had begun to turn the rest were absolutely fine – what a bargain! I cooked them down with some cinnamon scented icing sugar left over from Christmas baking and swirled some through nearly set vanilla bean ice cream. I served it topped with more of the raspberry coulis – the teens loved it!

no-churn-raspberry-swirl-vanilla-bean-ice-cream-with-fino-sherryNow I know that cinnamon and raspberries seem like an odd combination but it really works! My recipe also uses a fresh vanilla bean. There’s a great article here on how to get the seeds out and what to do with the pod but you can also substitute a teaspoon of vanilla bean paste instead.  The secret to a soft no-churn ice cream is the addition of  a little alcohol. As it has a low freezing point, it helps to keep the ice cream soft. I only had some fino sherry to hand which leant a subtle yet lovely fresh flavour to the ice cream. You can substitute this for vodka which will not add any flavour at all.  I have an ice cream maker which I do love to use but ever since I discovered this quick and easy way to make ice cream, I rarely use it. No more making custard and freezing the lonely egg whites! I first wrote about this when I posted my recipe for Lime Ice Cream in a Ginger Snap Crust  – if you missed that post, do skim through it as it has some interesting information on the magic ingredient and some delicious ingredient combinations too. P.S. What I learnt today – ice cream is really hard to photograph…

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Last week I had the honour of co-hosting Angie’s Friday Fiesta #15 with the lovely Jhuls of Not So Creative Cook. Jhuls was SO much fun to host with even though I did have to start hiding some of the desserts from her!! I was blown away by not only all the creativity out there but also how everyone got into the spirit, warmly commenting on each other’s posts as they hopped from blog to blog visiting each other. This really is such a wonderful virtual community and I am delighted to be a part of this gang!

This week Elaine of foodbod and Stacey of 10 Legs in the Kitchen are co-hosting Angie’s Friday Fiesta #16  – do check out their blogs if you haven’t already. Both of them have very different writing styles and interests in food.

To help cool things down (coz it’s gonna be a scorcher!!) I’m bringing tubs and tubs of this Raspberry Swirl Vanilla Bean Ice Cream with Fino Sherry to Angies Fiesta Friday #16.

I am also adding it to the Family Foodies challenge which is “Chill Out” for July hosted by Vanesther @ Bangers and Mash and Lou @ Eat Your Veg.

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So, don’t be shy – visit as many of the blogs as you can, follow the ones that are new to you, leave comments and tuck in!!

No-churn Raspberry Swirl Vanilla Bean Ice Cream with Fino Sherry

  • Servings: 500ml
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

INGREDIENTS

For the Raspberry Coulis:

  • 500g fresh raspberries
  • 5 heaped Tbsp icing sugar (approx 50 g)  (you may have to adjust this depending on how sweet/tart your fruit is)
  • ½ tsp cinnamon powder

For the Vanilla Bean Ice Cream:

  • 300 ml double cream
  • 1 x 397 g can of sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 vanilla bean
  • 2 Tbsp fino sherry or vodka (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Pick over the raspberries and discard any that are mouldy. Place on a medium-low heat, in a heavy bottomed saucepan with the sugar and cinnamon. Stir, allowing it to cook down to a thick syrupy mass – about 5 to 8 minutes. Turn off the heat and allow to cool down. You can sieve out the seeds but I didn’t bother.
  2. Put the double cream in a mixing bowl and beat with an electric mixer until it thickens. Scrape out seeds from the vanilla bean as well as the contents of the tin of condensed milk into the mixing bowl. Beat for 2 or 3 minutes, then add the fino sherry and beat to incorporate.
  3. Pour the mix into a 500 ml freezer proof container and place in the freezer for about an hour or so.
  4. Remove from the freezer and top with half of the compote. Mix it in gently and not too thoroughly as you are aiming for swirls rather than amalgamation. Replace in the freezer and freeze for another 4 or 5 hours.
  5. If it has been in the freezer overnight remove 10 minutes or so before serving.
  6. Serve topped with more raspberry coulis.

 

 

Lime Ice Cream in a Ginger Snap Crust

 

Lime Ice Cream in a Ginger Snap Crust | Selma's Table

Lime Ice-Cream in a Ginger Snap Crust

Lime Ice-Cream in a Ginger Snap Crust

We’ve been having a scorcher of a summer. Long, hot, sunny days and still, sticky nights punctuated by the odd thunderstorm; made bearable by the reassuring whirr of the electric fan. Not that I am complaining after the utterly miserable summers we have suffered in recent years but I have been making a LOT of ice-cream. Separating eggs, making custards, freezing egg-whites, planning on making meringues… But precisely because it has been so hot, I have been reluctant to switch on the oven and to be perfectly honest, mine is really playing up, which makes me even more reluctant to bake in it. And then I discovered that there is an ingredient which makes a rich tasting ice-cream, which yields easily under a greedy spoon; which does not involve custards, more freezing of egg whites or even churning. This magic ingredient is sweetened condensed milk – that stalwart of the banoffee pie. It is quite incredible and not a little dangerous because with a pot of double cream, a tin of condensed milk and some flavourings, you are only a couple of hours away from a gorgeous frozen nirvana.

Condensed milk (it is usually always sweetened) is essentially milk which has had water removed and sugar added to it. With an incredibly long shelf life, it and was ordered in great quantities as rations for American soldiers fighting the Civil War in the 1860’s. They spread the word on their return home which is when this ingredient was adopted into the mainstream. Now, of course, it is known everywhere; used for making sweet treats as well as for adding to coffee, tea and even stout.

Indeed, my first foray in the kitchen was as a toddler and involved my granny slicing up stale white bread into fingers and laying out separate bowls of condensed milk and coconut flakes in which to dip and roll the slices. Oh! It was sweet, sticky heaven for a child! These, I would place haphazardly on the baking tray and watch with growing anticipation as they turned a toasty brown in the oven, filling the air with the sweet comforting aroma of baking. I was only ever allowed to have two and now find myself wondering what happened to the rest.

Lime Ice-Cream in a Ginger Snap Crust

Lime Ice-Cream in a Ginger Snap Crust

I have tweaked the original recipe quite a lot. I don’t see the point of using 3/4’s of a cup of condensed milk, leaving behind a less than a quarter cup in the tin. What is to be done with such a small amount, since my son is no longer a toddler and would not have the slightest interest in dipping and rolling stale bread. Ditto the double cream. I stand firmly in the camp of Nigella Lawson on this point, who rather sensibly advocates using up ingredients in the measures in which they come – in as much as it is possible of course. We don’t really do graham crackers in the UK – I always use digestives instead but I quite liked the idea of a ginger biscuit base with lime. If I was making this for a dinner party, I would consider the addition of a layer of dark chocolate between the base and the cream, a delicious must.

I have been working on my photo taking skills – hope you can see an improvement! After a little research I have started using the Snapseed App to gussy up the shots! Let me know what you think.

Lime Ice-Cream in a Ginger Snap Crust

Blitzing the biscuits to a fine crumb

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Looking like damp sand after the addition of butter

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Ginger crust ready for the oven

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Grated lime zest

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Lime juice

When buying limes, give them a little squeeze – you want limes which yield a little, not rock hard balls which will have little juice.

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Thickened cream and lime juice mixture

This really is chemistry at work in the kitchen – the addition of lime juice to the condensed milk magically thickening the cream with no need to whip at all.

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Baked ginger crust (burnt edges trimmed)

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Ready for the freezer

Lime Ice-Cream in a Ginger Snap Crust

Lime Ice-Cream in a Ginger Snap Crust

With temperatures set to rise again you may find find yourself very glad to happen upon this the freezer. It is sweet, tart and creamy with a pleasing warmth from the ginger snap biscuit base. I find that the addition of raspberries goes very nicely with a slice.

I am adding this recipe  to the Family Foodies challenge which is “Chill Out” for July hosted by Vanesther @ Bangers and Mash and Lou @ Eat Your Veg.

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I’m also taking this over to Love in the Kitchen Tasty Tuesday for their Summer Ice-cream Social

Lime Ice Cream in a Ginger Snap Crust

  • Servings: 6 - 8
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Adapted from Serious Eats

INGREDIENTS

  • 20 ginger biscuits
  • 4 digestive biscuits or graham crackers
  • 75g butter at room temperature
  • 1 Tbsp lime zest which was the zest from 3 limes which were very well washed first.
  • 1/2 cup lime juice – in this case it was the juice of 3 juicy limes
  • 1 can (397g) of sweetened condensed milk
  • 300ml tub of double cream
  • A few raspberries to serve – optional

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat oven to 190C/375F
  2. Prepare your tin (a loose bottomed or springform one is best and if it isn’t non-stick then butter and flour it) I use a 9″/23cm loose bottomed non-stick one and like to put a circle of parchement paper on the base to make it really easy to slide onto a serving plate.
  3. Tip the biscuits into a food processor and blitz – you don’t want it to be powdery but neither should it be lumpy. Toss in the softened butter and blitz for a few moments until the mix resembles damp clumpy sand.
  4. Scrape out into the tin and pat the mix gently and evenly up the sides and on the base. Tamp it down gently with the bottom of a glass if you need to but don’t compact it too much. Pop it into the fridge for 15 mins then bake on the middle shelf for 15 minutes. Please check after 10 minutes – there is a lot of sugar in ginger biscuits which burns rather quickly. I found that the edges of the crust had caught but rescued the situation with a little judicious trimming once the shell had cooled. Place in the freezer while you get the filling ready.
  5. Zest the limes. Then put them on your work surface, lean on them a little and roll them back and forth a few times. This really helps to release the juice. Cut in half and juice them. I use a lovely olive wood reamer that I have had for years and no longer remember where I got it from. Pour the condensed milk and the double cream into a mixing bowl and hand whisk to mix the two together. Add the zest and the lime juice and continue mixing – it magically thickens in a couple of minutes.
  6. Dollop it into the cold shell, spreading it out with a spatula.
  7. Freeze for a couple of hours or longer, removing from freezer for 20 mins to 1/2 an hour before you want to eat.
  8. Dip your knife in hot water and slice, serving with raspberries or just as it is.

NOTES

If alcohol is added to the mixture, it lowers the freezing point making for a real soft serve ice-cream. If you don’t want to taste the alcohol, use a tablespoon or two of vodka otherwise use tequila. It will only require 10 minutes or so to soften out of the freezer if alcohol is added.

If you want to change the flavour of the biscuit base, lay the whole biscuits of your choice in a layer on the bottom of a tin and then add 2 or 3 more (depending on how big they are) to allow for the sides, before blitzing.

As a variation, try espresso powder and Tia Maria or cocoa powder and Creme de Cacao (instead of the lime zest and juice) and freeze in an appropriate 500ml container. I have made both and they are absolutely delicious. Either would be nice on a chocolate biscuit base or in a cone. Because of the alcohol this will only need 10 minutes or so, out of the freezer, to soften.

Warning -do not buy more than 2 tins of condensed milk at a time as this is just temptation at its very worst!

Copyright – © Selma Jeevanjee and Selma’s Table, 2013, 2014. Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material, including photographs without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Selma Jeevanjee and Selma’s Table with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.